Wednesday, June 14, 2017

Numeracy Skills (and other skills) Required to Learn to Tell Time

Hello readers!  I know it's summer break so I thought I'd offer you a few insights about learning to tell time as you prepare for the new school year.  Ha! Ha!  This is a long post and I promise the next post will be shorter!

I've seen children whiz through telling time and I've also seen the other end of it where children had difficulty.  One thing that I've learned is that there is often an underlying concept that a child is missing which causes him/her to struggle with learning to tell time.  Here are a few concepts and skills that need to be mastered in order for children to have success with telling time to the hours and half-hours.



Numeral Recognition and Numeral Sequencing

The numerals on an analog clock are from one to twelve.  One of the most basic skills is to recognize numerals from one to twelve.  It is impossible for a first grader to tell time to the hour without being able to recognize these numerals.  Students will also need to be able to sequence numerals from one to twelve.  A daily sequencing activity will build this skill.  Click the photo shown below and grab the set of numeral cards.  Print one page for every three students.  (Printing on card-stock paper will make them more durable for repeated use.)


Start by having the children sequence the numerals from left to right.



Then have the children sequence the numeral cards in a circular, clockwise fashion.



This is a five minute activity and can be done as a warm up at the beginning of a math lesson that is not associated with telling time.  After several days, provide the children with two straws of different lengths to represent the hour hand and the minute hand on an analog clock.  Have a DAILY routine of "Constructing a Clock".  The numeral cards and straws can easily be stored in plastic baggies for repeated use.  


The children can glue the numeral cards on a large paper circle when you begin your unit on telling time.  Use a marker to put a dot in the center of the paper circle.  Redistribute the straws and have the children display various times on their "clocks" by pointing the straws to the appropriate numerals with one end of each straw touching the dot that was made in the center of the paper.

Students glue the numerals on their clocks. The straws (the clock hands) remain unfastened to the clock.  Students show various times on the clock by pointing each "straw" to the numeral to match the time called out by the teacher.


There's more to telling time than meets the eyeRead on to learn what else is required before children can tell time to the hours and half-hours.  Find out what clocks you should avoid using!

Wednesday, June 7, 2017

May I Dab the Free Space?

"May I dab (do) the free space?" she asked.  I don't know what it is about young children and "The Free Space" but they LOVE the idea of having it on their bingo sheets!  

It was the first time this little gal used a paint dabber on a bingo game.  Boy was she thrilled to have that dabber in her hands!

Learning to tell time to the hours and half hours is a first grade math standard in many school districts throughout the United States.  Children are required to read times on both an analog clock as well as a digital clock.  These telling time bingo games include every time for hours and half hours.  Use a face clock or teacher demonstration clock to show times in analog form.  Then have your students find the corresponding time in digital form on their bingo sheets.

As you will see in the video segment, she dabs the SAME spot multiple times until I mention to her that she can dab the spot just once.  

Learning to tell time to the hours and half hours is a first grade math standard in many school districts throughout the United States.  Children are required to read times on both an analog clock as well as a digital clock.  These telling time bingo games include every time for hours and half hours.  Use a face clock or teacher demonstration clock to show times in analog form.  Then have your students find the corresponding time in digital form on their bingo sheets.
She's a quick study and does the remainder of the activity with a single dab in each spot!

Learning to tell time to the hours and half hours is a first grade math standard in many school districts throughout the United States.  Children are required to read times on both an analog clock as well as a digital clock.  These telling time bingo games include every time for hours and half hours.  Use a face clock or teacher demonstration clock to show times in analog form.  Then have your students find the corresponding time in digital form on their bingo sheets.

This was the first time we used my Telling Time Bingo sheets.  I wanted to see whether or not she could identify the digital style numeric font that I used in creating the game.  This is an essential skill before introducing the analog clocks with the game. She was an instant whiz at it!

video

The next time we use the Telling Time Bingo sheets we'll play it as a bingo game instead of using it as a following directions activity.  We'll also use an analog clock to put telling time to the hours and half hours into practice.  I might display at time such as 3:30 on an analog clock (face clock) and ask her to find the corresponding time in digital form on her bingo sheet.  This way, she gets exposure to both digital and analog times in the same sitting.

Learning to tell time to the hours and half hours is a first grade math standard in many school districts throughout the United States.  Children are required to read times on both an analog clock as well as a digital clock.  These telling time bingo games include every time for hours and half hours.  Use a face clock or teacher demonstration clock to show times in analog form.  Then have your students find the corresponding time in digital form on their bingo sheets.

Since I tested her (while video taping), I know she can recognize the digital times.  She also has gained confidence about using the digital time bingo sheets which will prepare her for the next level - time elapsed problem solving.

Learning to tell time to the hours and half hours is a first grade math standard in many school districts throughout the United States.  Children are required to read times on both an analog clock as well as a digital clock.  These telling time bingo games include every time for hours and half hours.  Use a face clock or teacher demonstration clock to show times in analog form.  Then have your students find the corresponding time in digital form on their bingo sheets.


GIVEAWAY!  I decided to have a giveaway for a chance to win TWO sets of paint dabbers.  I know that school budgets are limited and I thought this might help one educator.  Please be sure to follow the contest rules HERE.  Failure to do so will result in being disqualified from the contest.  Visit my new Facebook page HERE (not a requirement) and let me know how you plan to use paint dabbers in your classroom or home.  This contest ends on June 21st at 9:00 p.m. Scroll past the Rafflecopter to learn more about my Telling Time Bingo games.

UPDATE June 21st:  Congratulations to Angela!  Angela, you've won two sets of paint dabbers.  I've sent you an email requesting your mailing address.  Thank you everyone for entering my contestStay tuned for a small prize giveaway in July and then a larger prize giveaway in August.  Both will prizes will be items that will be mailed to the winners. 
  a Rafflecopter giveaway
I have several varieties of telling time bingo games.  If your are interested, click on any image shown below to view them at my shop.

https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/time-to-the-hour-and-half-hour-1045289

https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Telling-Time-for-15-Minutes-Before-and-15-Mnutes-After-the-Hour-1049803

https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/telling-time-within-15-minute-increments-Bundle-Black-and-White-1050141

Telling time to the hours and half hours is a first grade math standard.  When students are in second grade, they are required tell time in five minute increments.  It's a big jump from reading time by the hours and half hours to reading times for every five minutes.  Offering a transitional lesson with times at the quarter hours can bridge the gap between the two standardsBelow are some color versions of the same games.

https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Telling-Time-to-the-Hour-and-Half-Hour-1045334

https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Tell-Time-for-Quarter-Past-and-Quarter-Before-the-Hours-1045369

https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Telling-Time-Within-15-Minute-Increments-1048208

That's all for now!

Molly

  





Wednesday, May 24, 2017

Memorial Day Flower Boats



Read the previous blog post if you're interested in this activity.  Here's the link:
Memorial Day Flower Boats.

Children's Memorial Day Flower Boats

What better way is there for children to learn about the holidays than to participate in them!  Here's an idea that will help your students observe Memorial Day with a flower boat floating event.  These patriotic flower boats are simple to make!  Children can help decorate the boats by gluing artificial flowers to them.  Float the boats in a small plastic pool, pond, or other body of water.  Have a moment of silence, read a poem, give thanks, or read the names of local men and women who died while serving in the United States Armed Forces.  Children love the idea of floating boats which makes this a highly engaging activity.

Help your students observe Memorial Day with a flower boat floating event.  These patriotic flower boats are simple to make.  Children can help decorate the boats by gluing flowers on to them.  Float the boats in a small plastic pool, pond, or other body of water.  Have a moment of silence, give thanks, or read the names of local men and women who died while serving the United States Armed Forces.  Children love the idea of floating boats which makes this a highly engaging Memorial Day activity!
Describing why U.S. citizens celebrate Memorial Day is a Virginia Standard of Learning for Second Graders (2015 History/Social Science 2.5 - C)
I think I might know what your thinking.  It's something like, "Yikes!  It's the end of the school year!  I don't have time for this!"  Well, let me just mention that the end of the school year is one of the best times to plan highly motivating learning activities to keep students focused and to maintain positive behavior.  This activity is very simple and you probably already have a little plastic pool floating around the school from your field day event.  Plus, you'll be hitting a history lesson that incorporates creative writing with a class-created poem for your event.


Help your students observe Memorial Day with a flower boat floating event.  These patriotic flower boats are simple to make.  Children can help decorate the boats by gluing flowers on to them.  Float the boats in a small plastic pool, pond, or other body of water.  Have a moment of silence, give thanks, or read the names of local men and women who died while serving the United States Armed Forces.  Children love the idea of floating boats which makes this a highly engaging Memorial Day activity!
Toy boat floating in water.

I created two versions (Balloon Boat and Toy Boat) of this project and tested both of them out in a lake.  I was thrilled that both boats actually floated!  Keep reading if you would like to see what materials I used and read a step by step tutorial.

Balloon Boat:
  
I found everything I needed for the balloon boat at Walmart and the Dollar Tree.  The balloon boat was less than $5.00 to make!  I used a blue foam board called a "kickboard" from the Dollar Tree to make it.  It's made of the same material as pool noodles.  I also bought one set of decorative patriotic garland flowers that are leis.  I needed a balloon so I purchased a package of patriotic balloons.  Then I went to Walmart and bought a red colored parachute cord which is 18 feet long.  I had scissors and glue so I was finished with shopping for the balloon boat. 


Materials Needed:

Kickboard - $1.00
Flower Garland - $1.00
Balloons - $1.00
Parachute cord - $1.97
Non-Toxic, Multi-Purpose Glue
Scissors
Source of Water (A child's plastic pool will work.)
Total cost:  $4.97 (plus tax)  

Help your students observe Memorial Day with a flower boat floating event.  These patriotic flower boats are simple to make.  Children can help decorate the boats by gluing flowers on to them.  Float the boats in a small plastic pool, pond, or other body of water.  Have a moment of silence, give thanks, or read the names of local men and women who died while serving the United States Armed Forces.  Children love the idea of floating boats which makes this a highly engaging Memorial Day activity!
Flower garland, parachute cord, balloon, glue, scissors.


Help your students observe Memorial Day with a flower boat floating event.  These patriotic flower boats are simple to make.  Children can help decorate the boats by gluing flowers on to them.  Float the boats in a small plastic pool, pond, or other body of water.  Have a moment of silence, give thanks, or read the names of local men and women who died while serving the United States Armed Forces.  Children love the idea of floating boats which makes this a highly engaging Memorial Day activity!
Foam "kickboard"

Directions:

1.  Separate the flowers on the garland by cutting them apart.

Help your students observe Memorial Day with a flower boat floating event.  These patriotic flower boats are simple to make.  Children can help decorate the boats by gluing flowers on to them.  Float the boats in a small plastic pool, pond, or other body of water.  Have a moment of silence, give thanks, or read the names of local men and women who died while serving the United States Armed Forces.  Children love the idea of floating boats which makes this a highly engaging Memorial Day activity!
Cut apart the flower garland.

2.  View the two sides of the kickboard.  One side is curved upward at the center.  This is the side you will glue the flowers on.  Have the children glue the flowers on the kickboard.  Allow the glue to dry.

Help your students observe Memorial Day with a flower boat floating event.  These patriotic flower boats are simple to make.  Children can help decorate the boats by gluing flowers on to them.  Float the boats in a small plastic pool, pond, or other body of water.  Have a moment of silence, give thanks, or read the names of local men and women who died while serving the United States Armed Forces.  Children love the idea of floating boats which makes this a highly engaging Memorial Day activity!
Glue flowers on the foam kickboard.

Note:  We allowed 2 hours for drying time.  Due to the time limitations we had, we proceeded with the activity although the glue was not completely dried.  If possible, allow to the project dry overnight.
3.  Poke a small hole in the center of the kickboard.  (I used the blade of my scissors to do this.)  

Help your students observe Memorial Day with a flower boat floating event.  These patriotic flower boats are simple to make.  Children can help decorate the boats by gluing flowers on to them.  Float the boats in a small plastic pool, pond, or other body of water.  Have a moment of silence, give thanks, or read the names of local men and women who died while serving the United States Armed Forces.  Children love the idea of floating boats which makes this a highly engaging Memorial Day activity!
Poke a hole in the center of the kickboard.

Feed a balloon (not inflated) through the hole.  The opening of the balloon is on the opposite side as the side where the flowers are glued.

Help your students observe Memorial Day with a flower boat floating event.  These patriotic flower boats are simple to make.  Children can help decorate the boats by gluing flowers on to them.  Float the boats in a small plastic pool, pond, or other body of water.  Have a moment of silence, give thanks, or read the names of local men and women who died while serving the United States Armed Forces.  Children love the idea of floating boats which makes this a highly engaging Memorial Day activity!
Push a balloon through the hole made in the center of the kickboard.

Note:  Make the hole as small as possible.  If the hole is too large the tied knot in the balloon will slip through the hole.
4.  Poke another hole through the front of the kickboard.  

Help your students observe Memorial Day with a flower boat floating event.  These patriotic flower boats are simple to make.  Children can help decorate the boats by gluing flowers on to them.  Float the boats in a small plastic pool, pond, or other body of water.  Have a moment of silence, give thanks, or read the names of local men and women who died while serving the United States Armed Forces.  Children love the idea of floating boats which makes this a highly engaging Memorial Day activity!
Poke another hole in the front of the kickboard.

Feed the parachute cord through the hole.  Tie a knot at the two ends of the cord.

Help your students observe Memorial Day with a flower boat floating event.  These patriotic flower boats are simple to make.  Children can help decorate the boats by gluing flowers on to them.  Float the boats in a small plastic pool, pond, or other body of water.  Have a moment of silence, give thanks, or read the names of local men and women who died while serving the United States Armed Forces.  Children love the idea of floating boats which makes this a highly engaging Memorial Day activity!
Thread parachute cord through the hole in the front of the kickboard.
Note:  I was at a lake and therefore used the full length (18 ft.) of the parachute cord so that I could easily draw the boat out of the water.  If you are using a child's plastic pool, you might only need half of that length.
5.  Blow up the balloon and tie a knot at the opening.  

Help your students observe Memorial Day with a flower boat floating event.  These patriotic flower boats are simple to make.  Children can help decorate the boats by gluing flowers on to them.  Float the boats in a small plastic pool, pond, or other body of water.  Have a moment of silence, give thanks, or read the names of local men and women who died while serving the United States Armed Forces.  Children love the idea of floating boats which makes this a highly engaging Memorial Day activity!
Inflate the balloon.

The inflated side of the balloon is on the same side as the glued flowers.  The knot is on the opposite side.  

Help your students observe Memorial Day with a flower boat floating event.  These patriotic flower boats are simple to make.  Children can help decorate the boats by gluing flowers on to them.  Float the boats in a small plastic pool, pond, or other body of water.  Have a moment of silence, give thanks, or read the names of local men and women who died while serving the United States Armed Forces.  Children love the idea of floating boats which makes this a highly engaging Memorial Day activity!
Tie a knot in the balloon on the other side of the kickboard.

The inflated balloon assists the boat with floating.  This is important because of the added weight of the glue and the flowers.  The lightweight leis worked beautifully and they didn't get soggy in water!

Help your students observe Memorial Day with a flower boat floating event.  These patriotic flower boats are simple to make.  Children can help decorate the boats by gluing flowers on to them.  Float the boats in a small plastic pool, pond, or other body of water.  Have a moment of silence, give thanks, or read the names of local men and women who died while serving the United States Armed Forces.  Children love the idea of floating boats which makes this a highly engaging Memorial Day activity!
Float your boat!

Plan your observance!  Find a list of names of military men and women from your area who made the ultimate sacrifice in service to our country.  Create a class poem of gratitude.  If nothing else, plan to have a moment of silence.  The key is to get all of your students involved in the project.  This was an easy project because the kickboard and the flowers can be set out in the art area.  The children can add flowers to the kickboard as time permits ahead of the event.

Help your students observe Memorial Day with a flower boat floating event.  These patriotic flower boats are simple to make.  Children can help decorate the boats by gluing flowers on to them.  Float the boats in a small plastic pool, pond, or other body of water.  Have a moment of silence, give thanks, or read the names of local men and women who died while serving the United States Armed Forces.  Children love the idea of floating boats which makes this a highly engaging Memorial Day activity!
Children can glue flowers on as time permits when this project is put in the art area.

Take your boat(s) to your water source and float your boat(s).  Read the poem your class created out loud, have the children take turns reading the names of the men and women from your list, or have a moment of silence.  When you are finished, remove everything from the water.  You want to make sure that fish and other wildlife continue to enjoy their home!  Keep in mind that young children need CONSTANT supervision.  If you are planning this at a nearby pond, lake, or other body of water, you'll need one chaperone per child.

This idea was inspired by a Memorial Day flower boat craft activity using paper plates.  See that idea here:  Memorial Day Craft.

Keep going if you'd like to read about the Toy Boat version of this.